Get Your Copy Now: Resurrecting Black Wall Street

Photo source: http://bea2fulchaos.blogspot.com/
Photo source: http://bea2fulchaos.blogspot.com/

Get the order in and add this to the family library!

Just in case you think the story is less true because it’s being told by African-Americans, you can read Tulsa’s very own report yourself done decades later (yes, it’s easy to find online if you want to make the effort).

Or I’ll give you a freebie, as you can listen to the short podcast HERE by two Caucasian women on a show called, you guessed it, Stuff You Missed In History Class.

Well, truth be told, I can’t miss something I was never taught.

My kids know all about it though, and that’s why we love home schooling!!!

“Resurrecting Black Wall Street” not only tells the story of what happened, but discusses the aftermath.  We discuss the fight for reparations that was never answered by the Oklahoma legislature.  The film also discusses ways that the black community can learn from those who had the vision to create a kingdom of cooperative economics unlike anything seen before or since that tragic period in 1921. 

The film features several expert commentators, including Finance PhD Dr Boyce Watkins, Dominique Reese,  Michael Imhotep of the African History Network, and many more.  You MUST (emphasis theirs) share this story with your children and we must learn from this tragedy in order to build a better tomorrow.” – http://store.yourblackworld.net/products/resurrecting-black-wall-street-dvd-pre-order

 

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CSD Dinner Table Topic of the Day: College, Student Loans and 21st Century Sharecropping

Definition of SHARECROPPER

: a tenant farmer especially in the southern United States who is provided with credit for seed, tools, living quarters, and food, who works the land, and who receives an agreed share of the value of the crop minus charges
Source: http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/sharecropper
share36s

When I graduated high school, I remember people who didn’t go to college saying, “I know people with college degrees that make less than I do and I didn’t go to college!”

Now, I’ll be one of the folks telling high school grads, “I went to college and got a degree and I make more money than average, but I’m still poorer than most people who didn’t go to college!”

“Under this system, black families would rent small plots of land, or shares, to work themselves; in return, they would give a portion of their crop to the landowner at the end of the year.

The sharecropping system also locked much of the South into a reliance on cotton, just at the time when the price for cotton was falling. In addition, while sharecropping gave African-Americans autonomy in their daily work and social lives, and freed them from the gang-labor system that had dominated during the slavery era, it often resulted in sharecroppers owing more to the landowner (for the use of tools and other supplies, for example) than they were able to repay. Some blacks managed to acquire enough money to move from sharecropping to renting or owning land by the end of the 1860s, but many more went into debt or were forced by poverty or the threat of violence to sign unfair and exploitative sharecropping or labor contracts that left them little hope of improving their situation.”

Source: http://www.history.com/topics/sharecropping

At the current rate, over the next few decades, we will likely return back to a time when only the affluent can afford a college education and those who previously had earned a college degree, will not be able to afford to send their own children to school and will be paying student loan payments out of their social-security checks.

“Forget hitting the books son, better go dribble that basketball or throw that football to get a scholarship!”

students-loans2

Oh, and before someone comments, “Well, if you can’t afford to pay for a college degree, then you shouldn’t get a loan to pay for one!”

As a Dave Ramsey fan, I agree.

So surely you don’t have any credit cards, a car note or a mortgage right? Because if you can’t pay cash for a house, then why should you feel entitled to get a loan to buy a home. After all, the amount many owe in student loan debt equals what they would pay for a home.

Also, I’ll agree more with that statement when our student loan debt is seen as “too big to fail” like the banks that loaned the money, and maybe it can just be wiped off the books.

…just like the folks that walked away from their houses when they bought more than they should have when those loans were flowing like water.

Quite honestly, college is still the best option for the young and old. However, my gripe is with the “wisdom” that getting the education is a guarantee to a great paying job, home ownership, and “you’ll make much more money than your peers that didn’t go to college over your lifetime.”

Well, none of those are absolute truths.

But you better be absolutely sure what you want to major in, how much does it pay in the end and know exactly what you can pay off. Because while the banks that loaned you the money are too big to fail, you aren’t…and you can’t file bankruptcy on student loan debt like they can!

Check out this article from blog.metrotrends.org

With national student loan debt of roughly $1 trillion, it’s no surprise that many Americans are worried about their student loans.

Student loan debt has surpassed credit card debt and is second only to mortgage debt among those age 29-37. This ballooning student loan debt is a contributor to the “lost generation” of 20- and 30-somethings, whose average wealth is lower than the average wealth of those in their 20s and 30s three decades ago.

We published a new brief on school-related debt, using the FINRA Investor Educational Foundation’s 2012 National Financial Capability Survey. One in five adults age 20 and older has school-related debt and concern about the ability to repay is pervasive. The majority of student debt holders (57 percent) is worried that they may be unable to repay that debt.

If Congress doesn’t reach a compromise and the rate of subsidized student loans doubles, student loan debt and the increased payment burden will increase stress around repayment.

Beyond the short-term burden of repaying loan balances and interest, this early debt can have ripple effects and hinder borrowers’ ability to get on a secure wealth-building path. It can delay building a rainy day fund, homeownership, and saving for retirement.

Some of our findings may not be shocking to those who write monthly checks to Sallie Mae, yet they illustrate the magnitude and pervasiveness of the issue:

  • Student loan debt affects people at all levels of educational attainment. Nine percent of those with just high school diplomas have school-related debt, possibly incurred for non-degree training or to fund a child’s education. Twenty-five percent of those with some college education but no degree have student loans.
  • Student loan debt disproportionately affects African Americans and Hispanics. African Americans and Hispanics are twice as likely to have student loan debt as compared with whites. The large racial wealth gap and lower wealth among families of color likely lead these students to more often turn to student loans to finance their education.
  • Student loan debt affects people at nearly all income levels. Twenty percent of those in households with annual incomes under $25,000 have student loans—that’s only 2 percent more than those earning $100,000 and up.
  • Concern about repaying student loan debt also cuts across economic and demographic groups (see figure below). Nearly three-fourths of those with incomes less than $25,000 are concerned about their ability to repay—and so is a still-substantial 36 percent of those earning above $100,000.

College is a good investment for those able to complete the degree, but roughly half of people do not. Out of the starting gate, students should consider the cost and completion rate at the institution they plan to attend, earnings in their field of study, and type of student loan (public or private). Helping young people take advantage of student loans to get their degrees—but avoid burying themselves in debt—is a step in the right direction toward economic stability and wealth accumulation.

studentdebt_graph

Illustration by Daniel Wolfe / The Urban Institute.

 

CornerstoneDad Podcast #12 – CSD On The M-I-C With J-Sizzle

Broke-athletes

We have someone new joining the podcast, J-Sizzle!

J and I tried to limit our discussion to three topics, but we could barely make it. However, we still tried to catch up on some great topics that we’ve had on our minds that include:

  • ESPN’s 30-for-30: BROKE – We ponder the question, how could all of these athletes end up broke after making millions of dollars?
  • “I’d like to thank my lord and savior”…wait, what did Jamie Foxx just say? Did he say Barack Obama?
  • J-Sizzle answers the question that I will now ask every dad that appears on this show. He’s truly setting the bar high for the men that he comes in contact with, but what would your answer be to this all important question?

So tune in, check it out here

Podcast #12 with J-Sizzle

or on iTunes and feel free to let us know what you think!

 

CSD Dinner Table Topic of the Day – Dad, Which Would You Prefer?

…for your son to come home and tell you that he cashed in his student loan check or maxed out his new credit card (because you know, you gotta establish your credit right?) on this:

Thanks to Jay Tumbleweed for shooting this one over to me! – http://autos.yahoo.com/blogs/motoramic/florida-most-blinged-camaro-zl1-brings-haters-force-171508028.html

 

OR

For your daughter to come home for dinner with her new boyfriend and when he takes off his coat, you see this:

http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/the-turnstile/arms-dealer-check-guns-weightlifter-182121685.html

Discuss!

 

CSD

CornerstoneDad Podcast #12 – Say Your Love, Show Your Love!

Catching up after a long break! We talk about where I’ve been and what’s been going on.

Plus:

– Life Action Summit and what it has done for me.

– Which comes first, the sports our kids play or the family?

– Best CSD Driveway EVER…Gullwing, CTS-V, Vette and GT-R!

– Main Topic – Do you tell and show your kids that you love them?

Plus, I wonder why a kid sporting $400 LeBron James gym shoes…is riding the bus!

Check out the podcast by clicking HERE-PODCAST #12

 

What Did Boney Say: How NOT To Treat Your Employees

Big Homie (7 yrs. old) and Boney (5 yrs. old) were playing. Big Homie was her boss and asked Boney to draw something.

Somewhere along the line, Boney said, “How much do I get paid for this?”

Big Homie said, “I do not have any money, so I’ll give you some Monopoly money.”

Boney expressed her concern of not being paid with real money.

Big Homie basically said, “You’re fired!”

Boney then decided that she will go in her room and barricade the door because, “…she didn’t want to be disturbed.” However, she really did not want to let him in.

What was her former boss’s response?

He offered her the job back, but through the door, she refused.

So his next action, was to go in his room and barricade himself behind the door!

Life lesson for those of us in the workplace?

If you treat your employees bad, one day, no matter how grateful you think they should be in this economy, they are going to leave and not come back.

If you’re an employee, it’s smart to find out how much you are going to get paid BEFORE doing the work. Because in the end, she has five other people in this house the she may be able to market her talent of drawing to, but she’s the cheapest labor that he can find…so his baricade might as well be for the bill-collectors when he has to close up shop.

“When Keeping It Real and Outsourcing Goes Wrong”

Did you hear that America?

CSD

A Body Enslaved, But A Mind Set on Freedom: A Letter From A Former Slave To His “Master”

In CornerstoneDad’s house, Black History Month is not in February, it is all year. There is never just a month that we watch “Martin Luther The King” videos (as we used to say in my elementary school), Eyes on the Prize or something on American slavery. Sorry, history is history and truth is truth, and those topics should not just be discussed by families with parents who descended from slaves but by ALL families and schools in America if they are truly teaching history.

So while I did not want to write anything on slavery (or MLK) this month, my wife sent me this article that desires attention. An enormous mind-map could be created from the words of this former slave.

I’d love to hear your thoughts as you read the letter that can be found here.

Parents of all people groups should share this tremendous letter with their children to (and the fact that it’s Black History Month is a good excuse if you’ve never tackled racial issues in your family before) give them insight into American slavery. It helps explain:

 

– Why descendants of slaves in America share the same last name as their slave owner. [Notice both are named Anderson?]

– American slavery’s hierarchy was NOT like biblical slavery and the slaves were not employees. [Notice that Jourdon Anderson speaks of the attempted murder on his life as if this was no big deal or common?]

– The importance that Jourdon Anderson placed on education as obviously, he was a very intelligent man himself. [So not all slaves couldn’t read, write or do arithmetic.]

– How Jourdon overcame the stigma placed on him and his family in the north as people knew they were former slaves.

– How descendants of slaves started on an uneven playing field as they left fleeing for their lives in some cases like Jourdon, they started from nothing in a new location WITH FAMILIES and were never, ever compensated fairly for the work they had done for most of their lives [after 30 years, shouldn’t Jourdon have been retiring by American standards?]

– The faith and knowledge Jourdon had that God was going to judge and was still in control as he wrote, “We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense” and later said, “Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.”

Galations 6:7 Do not be deceived: God cannot be mocked. A man reaps what he sows. – 

Ecclesiastes 12:14 For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil.

Luke 12:4-5 Do not fear those who can kill the body and afterwards have no more that they can do. But I will warn you whom to fear: fear the One who after He has killed has authority to cast into Hell; yes, I tell you, fear Him.

1 Timothy 1:8-11 8 We know that the law is good if one uses it properly. 9 We also know that the law is made not for the righteous but for lawbreakers and rebels, the ungodly and sinful, the unholy and irreligious, for those who kill their fathers or mothers, for murderers10 for the sexually immoral, for those practicing homosexuality, for slave traders and liars and perjurers—and for whatever else is contrary to the sound doctrine 11 that conforms to the gospel concerning the glory of the blessed God, which he entrusted to me.

(Don’t be mad at me, I didn’t say it, the Bible did…you know, we do claim to be a Christian country and all…right? “One nation, under God…”America…God shed his grace on thee…” and all those other things we learned in school…remember?)

There are many more points that could be brought up, but I’m going to ask that you chime in with a few from what you read.

To me, Joudon Anderson is a true American hero. While he will never have a county, school and other structures built in his honor like slave owners such as the Macomb’s in Michigan, he showed tremendous respect, dignity and wisdom in dealing with his former captor and deceiver.

…and you know, I have a feeling that if ole P.A. Anderson would have offered him the world financially, Mr. Jourdon Anderson still would not have returned “to his old master”.

That’s freedom to die for.

Happy New Year – from CornerstoneDad

Dads, have you made that New Year’s Resolution yet? Whether you have or have not, check out the tips at All-Pro Dad titled:

Our Classic 10 Ways to be an All Pro Dad  http://www.allprodad.com/top10/parenting/our-classic-10-ways-to-be-an-all-pro-dad/

You can find details at the link above, but here’s a peek at the list:

1.) Love your wife

2.) Spend time with your kids

3.) Be a role model

4.) Understand and enjoy your children

5.) Show affection

6.) Secure your family’s financial future

7.) Eat together as a family

8.) Discipline with a gentle spirit

9.) Pray and worship together

10.) Realize you are a father forever

If you have any other good ideas of goals for dad’s or would like to just share some that you have, let us know in the comments section!

Make 2012 the year you become the dad that you want to be and the year you help make your sons and daughters the men and women that they are to be.

CornerstoneDad Podcast Episode #6 – Preparing for A Family? Sorry, You’ll Never Be Prepared

At the beach enjoying the children, but it hasn’t always been this easy! In this episode, I have the most beautiful co-host in the world, my wife. We tell a little bit about us and how our lives have changed with every child that we have been blessed with. We didn’t always see it as a blessing, but thank God he knows better than we do.

Click to listen: CornerstoneDad Podcast Episode #6 – Preparing for A Family? Sorry, You\’ll Never Be Prepared

Feel free to email me at: cornerstonedadpodcast@gmail.com and leave your comments about the show or tell us how your life has changed with your children. Have things gone exactly the way you’ve expected them to go? Let us know!


Did Last Christmas Bankrupt Your Family?

Won't take too strong of a wind to blow down this House of Cash...and how about yours?

Right after Thanksgiving, I told you my feelings about the culture’s push to encourage more-and-more Americans to get into debt. With reports of a possible “W” recession (by the same folks that told you to spend money) and little job security, you would think American’s would learn their lesson.

However, many did not. The Piper must be paid eventually.

Creditcards.com reported that personal bankruptcies rose eight percent in 2010. But the telling statement may have been the following:

“We have a situation that is nowhere near resolved right now,” given the continued sky-high unemployment rate and the millions who owe far more on their homes than their properties are worth, says David Jones, president of the Association of Independent Consumer Credit Counseling Agencies. On top of that, Jones worries about the reports of a robust 2010 holiday shopping season. “That’s going to hit home this month and next,” Jones says, fearing it will fuel bankruptcy filings in the first half of 2011.”

Read more: http://www.creditcards.com/credit-card-news/bankruptcy-statistics-2010-q4.php#ixzz1Bots6bpC

Looks like 2011 may not deliver the recovery many desire to see in their households because of too much “fun” in 2010.