CSD Podcast #18 – The Tribe and I Give Our Review of the Movie RACE

RACE of FALSE

Welcome to our kitchen table! Make yourself comfortable, sit-back, gather your thoughts. The kids and I went to the movies to see the movie Race and decided to have a hot mic and let you listen in to one of our fairly typical discussions.

Click HERE to listen:

Forgive the noise in the background, as our dining room table is certainly not a sound-proof studio. Having the windows open on a warm day was no help either.

The kids made me so proud, as each expressed their own thoughts, aren’t afraid to be challenged, but were a bit afraid of the microphone. They made me excited (so forgive my enthusiasm), but I really got comfortable kicking it with them as people, and not children.

They did need to learn that silence on the air is a no-no!

If  you’ve seen the movie Race, great. If not, spoiler alerts abound, but I think you know how the story ended.

We teach our children to think critically about all things, most notably the bible, politics, education and especially media. You will hear some of the trigger points that we look for to tell if a person or organization has a certain bias. In media, where there are absolutely no coincidences and everything is a particular way for a particular reason, we are especially critical.

Therefore, we don’t believe in conspiracy theories (e.g. they didn’t mean that, you are reading too much into ___), but understand that every detail is intentional, whether through omission or commission.

Our soundtrack for the show?

BDP’s, You Must Learn – what else for such an occasion! This is certainly an anthem for us and one of the first songs that taught me more black history than I ever learned in my 12 years of schooling. I remember hearing the album cut and getting mad that it wasn’t the remix/video version:

If you’d like to learn more about fact and fiction featured in the film, I encourage you to check out http://www.historyvshollywood.com/reelfaces/race/.

Remember:

propaganda

  • : ideas or statements that are often false or exaggerated and that are spread in order to help a cause, a political leader, a government, etc.

Source: merriam-webster

 

I leave you with comments from the above website, historyvshollywood. The movie basically ignored how the story really ended, and that explains quite a bit in and of itself.

“What happened to Jesse Owens following his success in Berlin?

In researching the Race true story, we learned that following his success at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, the Amateur Athletic Union had arranged a post-Olympic tour of Europe for Owens to participate in. Owens found himself under financial strain while on the often unpredictable Olympic tour and instead decided to return home to his wife and try his luck in Hollywood. He hoped to capitalize on his fame much like Olympic swimmer Johnny Weissmuller did after medaling in the 1924 and 1928 Olympics. Unlike Weissmuller, who found fame starring in the Tarzan movies, Owen’s skin color undoubtedly affected his job prospects in a country that was still separated by segregation. He only managed to find limited success on the vaudeville circuit. The decision to try to capitalize on his triumphs as an athlete put him at odds with the athletic union, who stripped him of his amateur status.

“After I came home from the 1936 Olympics with my four medals, it became increasingly apparent that everyone was going to slap me on the back, want to shake my hand or have me up to their suite,” Owens commented, “but no one was going to offer me a job.” -HistoryNet.com

With limited opportunities and a wife and three daughters to support, Owens did things like running against racehorses and working at gas stations. “What was I supposed to do?” Owens said later. “I had four gold medals, but you can’t eat four gold medals.” He staged a series of post-Olympic comebacks, some successful, some not. He eventually moved to Chicago and traveled the country as an inspirational speaker. He spent much of his spare time working with disadvantaged youth. Over the years, he wasn’t untouched by controversy. At times, he was called an “Uncle Tom” for refusing to take a more disruptive stance against racism. However, in the end, Owens is held in no less esteem than fellow race pioneers likeJackie Robinson and Joe Louis. All took enormous strides against racism via defining moments that helped to encourage a change in the cultural landscape. -NYTimes.com”

Source: http://www.historyvshollywood.com/reelfaces/race/

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